EBENEZER RICHARDSON
MARTHA ELLEN TAYLOR
PLAIN CITY, UTAH USA
Ebenezer Richardson
1881-1934
Martha Ellen Taylor
1883-1974
M: 22 Apr 1902
Luella Pearl Richardson
1903-1988
Ada May Richarson
1904-1965
Marguerite Richardson
1907-2007
Gladys Amelia Richardson
1909-1978
Leland Clawson Richardson
1911-1980
Le Roy Judkins
1901-1967
Ernest F Kammeyer
1901-1989
Adrian Joseph Van
Drimmelen
1905-1989
Lewis James Iverson
1906-1978
Helen Rasmussen
1915-2000
Emma Richardson
1914-1995
Elvin James Richardson
1916-1960
Arthur Leroy Richardson
1919-1980
Glen Clarence Richardson
1921-1984
Beverly Jean Richardson
1927-1979
Alma Clarence Morby
1915-1954
Annie Madeline Dallinga
1924-1992
Velissa Sarah Larsen
1921-
Velma Sarah Larsen
1924-2002
Thomas Garth Pierce
1926-2009
EBENEZER CLAWSON RICHARDSON JR FAMILY
History of Ebenezer Clawson Richardson
Contributed By Gene Hancock · 2013-03-16


HISTORY OF EBENEZER CLAWSON RICHARDSON

NOTE: The following history of Ebenezer Clawson Richardson was found while searching for information about him on the Internet in the spring of
2007. ( Eugene M. Hancock a great great grandson.)
Taken from The Richardson Book
ID: 129 Name: Ebenezer Clawson Richardson, Given Name: Ebenezer Clawson, Surname: Richardson, ***: Male, Birth: 7 August, 1815 in Dryden,
Thompkins, New York, Christening: 1840, Death: 27 September, 1874 in Plain City, Weber County, Utah, Burial: September, 1874 in Ogden, Weber
County, Utah, Reference Number: REBE 1815,
LDS Baptism: October, 1839, Temple: LVG Endowment: 30 January, 1846, Temple: Nauvoo, Nauvoo, Illinois( original), Sealing Child: 23 October,
1884, Temple: Logan, Logan, Utah,
Change Date: 10 September, 2002 at 21:52 Note.
Ebenezer Clawson Richardson was born on 7 August, 1815 at Dryden, Tompkins County, New York to Josiah Richardson and Lowly Foote. He grew
to young manhood in the family of eleven children and when he was eighteen years old (1833), he met and married a beautiful dark eyed, brunette girl,
Angeline King. They both were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints and in the fall of 1834 were baptized by the Prophet
Joseph Smith. Their first child, a little girl, Mary Amanda, was born to them 24 August, 1834 in Greenwood, New York, where they continued to live
for sometime .
They soon migrated to Kirtland, where the majority of the Saints were living. Albert Ebenezer was born to them in 1837, George Allen in 1839, and
Eliza in 1843. This was the year that her husband was called to enter the covenant of plural marriage and he took to wife Polly Ann Child, a beautiful
and educated girl of twenty two as his second wife. This marriage was performed by Joseph Smith. Angeline gave birth to Josiah on 16 April, 1844.
The Saints were horrified and heart broken when the prophet, Joseph Smith, and his brother Hyrum, the patriarch, were martyred but the church soon
had at its helm the able leader, Brigham Young.
During this trying period there were many unable to stand the mob violence and persecutions who left the church but the Richardsons remained
faithful and accepted the persecutions as the will of God.
The family moved from String Prairie to Galina and then to Nauvoo. In 1844 Loly, Ebenezer’s mother, died of chill fever and was buried in Nauvoo.
They were driven from Nauvoo eventually and we find Ebenezer and families in Council Bluffs, Iowa at Winter Quarters in 1846. Here Angeline gave
birth to a little daughter, Lola, and in 1846 to another daughter Jane. Both of these little girls died in 1848 and are buried in Council Bluffs, Iowa
cemetery. Here Ebenezer married as his third wife Phoeb Wooster Child, a beautiful girl and sister to Polly Ann. A little son, Alfred Bosworth, was
born to Polly and also was buried in Council, Bluffs beside little Jane and Lola. In 1849 Phoebe’s first baby, Amanda Melvina, was born and she felt
favored of heaven in being able to keep her. This was to be her only girl, for in due time she became the mother of ten more children, all boys, and
raised all but John Lawson, who died when three years old .
Polly Ann was the mother of five boys and one girl; She raised four to adulthood. Angeline became the mother of twelve children, raising eight to
adulthood. They arrived in Salt Lake in the fall of 1850 and settled in Bingham’s Fort, just north of Ogden, now called Five Points.
Ebenezer took up a farm where the Union Depot now stands. Times were soon better; The fields were yielding and the flocks and herds had increased.
In 1857 Ebenezer was called to go on a mission to South Africa. He helped to convert and baptize the Gilson Family to Mormonism while on his
mission. They migrated to Utah and moved to Ogden to live. In due time in 1859, Ebenezer married Elizabeth Gilson, daughter of William Gilson and
Charlott King. The other wives, although close to each other, did not take kindly to his young bride. They felt that they were entitled to all the help he
could give them in raising their families. Five children were born to Elizabeth ( Betsy), and she not being happy with conditions as they were, took her
five children and moved to Oregon to live.
Early in 1869 the Richardsons moved to Plain City where a home was bought for Angeline, and nearby Polly Ann and Phoebe shared the big rock
house .
Ebenezer returned to the mines in California and while working there his foot was crushed by falling rock. When word was received of the accident,
Polly Ann and her son Warren went to California by wagon and brought him home. It was a long trip back and even though they were accompanied by
a doctor, blood poison set in. Ebenezer died about a month after returning home at the age of fifty-nine. Death came on 27 September, 1874 in Plain
City, Weber County, Utah. He was buried in Ogden cemetery.
He was the father of thirty-four children.
Ebenezer had moved along with the Saints from place to place. He was a body guard to the Prophet Joseph Smith. At the time of Haun’s Mill
massacre, he was sent with another man to Haun’s Mill to get Joseph Young’s family. Ebenezer was shot through the chest. The bullet went through
his body and lodged in his back just under the skin. His companion cut it out with a knife and through their faith they were able to go on their way.
Ebenezer had three wives before he reached Utah: Angeline King, Polly Ann Child, and Phoebe Child. Polly and Phoebe were sisters. Shortly after
coming to Utah, they went to California. Polly lived with him while they were there and that is where Ebenezer Clawson , their son, was born. They
moved around a great deal from Ogden to Riverdale to Ogden Valley and then finally to Plain City. While they lived in Ogden he was deputy Sheriff.
The experience is told that a large company of men went through Ogden without paying for customary toll. Ebenezer along with Bill Brown rode out to
their camp and collected the amount.
He played the violin and fiddled for dances. He liked to josh with the young people. He was a large man in stature and had dark, curly hair.
On Sunday, October 6, Ebenezer was appointed an elder under the hands of Reynolds Cahoon, Seymour Brunson, Samuel Bent and Alpheus Cutler.
He was called on his mission when he was 42 years old.
History of the South African Mission ( taken from the Deseret News Church section, January 2, 1954) At a conference held in Salt lake City on
August 28, 1852, elders Jesse Haven, Leonard I. Smith and William H. Walker were called to open a mission in South Africa. Immediately upon their
arrival, the three missionaries made application for use of the town hall, which was granted upon condition that they pay for the lighting. They made
arrangements to hold meetings in the hall for six consecutive nights, and commenced to advertise their meetings. On the first evening, April 25, the
hall was nearly filled but when testimony was borne to the divine mission of the Prophet Joseph Smith, the congregation became so excited that it was
impossible to continue the meeting because of the confusion. The following evening the missionaries found the hall closed against them. They,
however, obtained the use of other halls, but mobbers caused so much confusion that it was impossible to speak. Nevertheless , some converts were
made, but they were afraid to take a decided stand because of persecution. Finally, a Mr. Nicholas Paul of Mowbray ( a suburb of Cape Town), a man
of influence, permitted the missionaries to hold meetings in his home. Informing the audience at the beginning of the meetings that if they did not wish
to listen they could leave and that the first man who offered an insult on his premises would be in danger of having more holes made through him than
a skimmer and as long as the missionaries remained in the vicinity, Mr. Paul was the missionaries’ friend. Afterwards he and the members of his
family were baptized. On June 16 , the first branch of the Church in South Africa was organized at Mowbray, four miles from Capetown.
At a conference held at Port Elizabeth on August 13, 1855, the “ Church In The Cape of Good Hope” ( South African Mission) reported that there
were three Conference Districts, Six Branches and a total membership of 126 persons.
Three months later, in November, Elders Smith and Walker left for home accompanied by fifteen emigrating Saints bound for Utah. A month later
Elder Haven went home. Up to the time of his leaving 176 persons had been baptized.. Two local Elders were left in charge of the Saints. In 1857,
Elder Ebenezer C. Richardson was sent from the British Mission to preside over the Cape of good Hope Mission. He was accompanied by Elder
James Brooks. When they left South Africa to return to America in the following spring of 1858, the mission membership had increased to 243. In
1865 the last missionaries left South Africa. Two local Elders were left in charge. Thirty-eight years elapsed before the South African Mission was
reopened by American missionaries. In spite of the long lapse of years, they found on their arrival a few scattered members of the church showing that
the seed sown by the former missionaries still bore fruit and that at no time since the mission was opened in 1853 had the Cape of Good Hope and the
surrounding districts been without at least a few members of the Church. Since 1905 work has progressed in the mission which today has a
membership of approximately 1700 members.

In 1858, Saturday, April 24th The Millennial Star of this date contains the following:
Cape of Good Hope Mission. We learn by correspondence from Elder E.C. Richardson, President of the Good Hope Mission, the condition and
prospects of the work of God in that country. Since the arrival of our correspondent success to the cause, and satisfaction to themselves, and a
blessing to the Saints. Elder Richardson and Brooks found the Church at Capetown in somewhat an indifferent condition on their arrival; but through
the blessings of God, they were able to revive the Church. In that place they have baptized , and rebaptized 64, ten of whom are new members. After
this reformation had infused new life into them, the law of tithing was inculcated, the Spirit of gathering infused and a penny fund established. Previous
to President Richardson’s instructions to the Elders there, relative to emigration, the Saints had cherished the fond anticipation of speedily gathering
to Zion. They were willing to appropriate all their means to accomplishment of this object, and as many as 3 or 4 hundred expected to have emigrated
in the course of a year.
At the time of this writing , Elder Richardson in company with his fellow laborer, Elder Brooks, intended to start on the next Tuesday for Boston per
ship Gemsbrook. They had lacked no necessary blessings while on their mission; and excepting its attendant difficulties and a little persecution ,their
labors had been successful.
“ Ebenezer Clawson Richardson, President of South African Mission from 1857-1861, was called at the April Conference 1857, In Salt lake City Utah,
to fill a mission to Europe. He arrived in Liverpool August 4, 1857 and was appointed August 22, 1857 to labor in The Cape of Good Hope Colony,
South Africa, September 29, 1857"
Taken from L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol.4 — Jensen.


EBENEZER CLAWSON RICHARDSON BLESSING

A blessing upon the head of E. C. Richardson given in the House of The Lord in Great Salt Lake City April 22, 1857 under the hands of Orson Hyde
and Wilord Woodruff.
Brother Richardson in the name of Jesus Christ we lay our hands upon thy head and set thee apart on thy mission and calling even to South of Africa
and to the Cape of Good Hope to minister the word of life to the people of that part of the globe. We say unto thee be thou faithful and gird up thy loins
of thy mind and give thyself unto the Lord and unto prayer and he shall bear thee up in safety and the winds and the waves shall have no power over
thee. But thou shall be preserved and the Angel of God shall go before thee and be round about thee and will prepare the way before thee and be
round about thee, and will prepare the way before thee . Lift up thy heart , rejoice and be glad for thy labors are hazardous, yet thy blessings shall be
equal and great inasmuch as thou are faithful and shall magnify thy calling before the Lord . We seal upon thee all thy former blessings and covenants
that they may rest upon thee in full force and virtue and by faith and fellowship of the saints thou shall go forth and labor and thrust in thy sickle and
reap and bear a faithful testimony and clear thy garments of the blood of this generation and inasmuch as thou art faithful thou shalt live to behold the
land where thou are destined to labor even to the sunken in the sea. We seal upon thee the blessings which thy soul desires that thy heart may be
made glad before the Lord and that thou mayest have power to rebuke transgression and sin and have power to overcome the devil, the world and the
flesh and the lusts thereof and the fruits thereof that thy joy may be in the Lord and He will bring thy desires to pass and give thee power to do great
good and to magnify thy calling in the South that thou mayest be had in remembrance before the Lord forever and ever. These blessings we seal upon
thee in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.

G.D. Watt, reporter

( Research : 1870 Census. 1860 Census. 1850 Census.

Father: Josiah Richardson, b: 23 Apr 1783 in Middlebury, New Haven, Connecticut
Mother: Lowly or Lola Foote, b: 19 Jan 1778 in Harwinton, Litchfield, Connecticut

Marriage 1: Angeline King, b: 25 Nov 1813 in Greenwood, Stueben, New York, c: 25 Nov 1820, Married: 1833 in Greenwood, Stueben, New York
Sealing Spouse: 27 Feb 1848 in Nauvoo - Nauvoo Illinois (original), Change Date: 10 Sep 2002
Children:
1. Mary Amanda Richardson, b: 24 Aug 1834 in Greenwood, Steuben, New York
2. Albert Ebenezer Richardson, b: 2 May 1837 in Missouri
3. George Allen Richardson, b: 24 Dec 1839 in Adams County, Illinois
4. Eliza Richardson, b: 17 Mar 1843 in Lee, Lee, Iowa
5. Josiah Richardson, b: 16 Apr 1844 in Stringtown, Pottawattamie, Iowa
6. Loly Ann Richardson, b: 13 May 1846 in Stringtown, Iowa, Missouri
7. William Alma Richardson, b: 19 Jan 1848 in Winter Quarters, Missouri
8. Jane Richardson, b: 3 Jun 1848 in Stringtown, Iowa, Missouri
9. Emeline Lafanny Richardson, b: 1 Sep 1850 in Council Bluffs, Iowa
10. Sylvester Richardson, b: 14 Feb 1854 in Kane, Weber, Utah
11. Alonzo Richardson, b: 2 Jan 1854 in Stringtown, Iowa, Missouri
12. M John Richardson, b: 17 Mar 1856 in Stringtown, Iowa, Missouri
Marriage 2: Polly Ann Child
Married: November 1843 in Greenfield, Saratoga, NY
Sealing Spouse: 27 Feb 1848 in NAUVO - Nauvoo Illinois (original), Change Date: 4 Jun 2001
Children:
1. Alfred Bosworth Richardson, b: 8 Feb 1848 in Potawatomi, Iowa
2. Warren Richardson, b: 4 May 1850 in Potawatomi, Iowa
3. Ebenezer Clawson Richardson, b: 11 Oct 1852 in Marysville, Eldorado County, California
4. Angeline Richardson, b: 21 Aug 1857 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
5. Levi Asa Richardson, b: 16 Oct 1860 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
6. Baby Richardson, b: 1862 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
7. Orville Richardson, b: 11 Jul 1863 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah

Marriage 3: Phebe Wooster Child, b: 19 Jan 1833 in Hammond, St Lawrence, New York
Married: 13 May 1848 in Council Bluffs, Pottawatamie, Iowa
Sealing Spouse: 14 May 1848, Change Date: 4 Jun 2001
Children:
1. Amanda Melvina Richardson, b: 23 Aug 1849 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa
2. Charles Clawson Richardson, b: 3 May 1851 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
3. Franklin Dewey Richardson, b: 9 May 1854 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
4. Cornelius Richardson, b: 20 Mar 1856 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
5. Chauncy West Richardson, b: 15 Oct 1861 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
6. Alfred Bosworth Richardson, b: 9 Apr 1861 in Riverdale, Weber County, Utah
7. John Lawson Richardson, b: 8 Mar 1863 in Riverdale, Weber County, Utah
8. Myron Barber Richardson, b: 21 Feb 1865 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
9. William Wallace Richardson, b: 31 Mar 1867 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah
10. Ezra Chase Richardson, b: 26 May 1868 in Riverdale, Weber County, Utah
11. Joseph Ebenezer Richardson, b: 1 JUL 1871 in Plain City, Weber County, Utah

Marriage 4: Elizabeth (Betsy) Gillson, b: 24 Jan 1842 in, England
Married: 30 Nov 1860
Sealing Spouse: 30 Nov 1860 in Ehous - Endowment House, Change Date: 4 Jun 2001
Children:
1. David Richardson, b: 1 Nov 1860 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
2. Charlotte Ann Richardson, b: 3 Jan 1863 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah
3. Frances Richardson, b: 23 Feb 1865 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah
4. Alonzo King Richardson, b: 3 Apr 1867 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah
5. Edward Richardson, b: 18 Apr 1869 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah
6. Luella Richardson, b: 1872

Following are some notes about Ebenezer Clawson Richardson that was written in an old notebook with poems and verses by Martha A. Richardson
Hancock about her grandfather. I felt the notes were very interesting and felt they should be included here.
( Eugene M. Hancock)

He took a company of saints to Salt Lake City and took a load of provisions back to the saints left at Winter Quarters who were starving.
He was a very strong man. One day he he became very out of patience with a scoundrel and picked him up and spanked him. The man was a good
sized man.
One day a mob who was persecuting the saints were after him to kill him. They were chasing him on a horse when he thought sure they’d over take
him. He went around a hill and came to a farm house. He ran his horse into the barn and grabbed an ax close by and started chopping wood. When the
mob came by they asked if he had seen a man go by. He said, “ yes he just raced by”. And pointing in the direction he wanted the mob to go. He said,
“ He went that way.” and then escaped in the opposite direction.
He was Joseph Smith’s body guard and attorney. At the time the prophet was killed he was coming to the jail with a reprieve. He was one of the men
who helped bury the prophet.
The mob who was after Joseph Smith shot him clear thru his body with a navy rifle.
He never shaved in his life. He had a long curly beard and tucked it inside his shirt. On Sunday he would take it out of his shirt and comb it till it
looked nice.
Two men who were known as the meanest and most hateful men in the valley set fire to eight large stacks of his grain and burned it and all his
machinery to the ground. This left him financially broke and with all his children and wives to care for he decided to go to California and mine. In the
mine he had an accident which crushed his leg so badly the doctor said it would have to be amputated. He would not allow his leg to be removed and in
a few months after returning to Plain City he passed away.
He was educated as an attorney.
Aunt Amanda Chase, his daughter, during the days of persecution came to the home of her mother to escape the officers. They hid her in the flour bin
and she was not found.
William his son was guarding a house where George Q. Cannon and another son Warren was hiding and the officers came and told Uncle Will if he
didn’t tell them where they were they’d take him to jail. So Uncle Will said, “they’re in the basement and if you go down there I’ll lock you in.” The
men left and Uncle Will rushed Brother Cannon and Uncle Warren over to the temple where they hid several months .
Uncle Sy Richardson was in jail a year . During his imprisonment he worried about his family.
He had two wives, Aunt Sarah and Aunt Cassie, and their children. One night he dreamed he saw Aunt Cassie run and jump over a grave. He could
see her long dark hair as she ran. Not long after this he received word of her death. The other wife mothered his three children and they grew up as
her own.
FOUND AT: PARTRIDGE FAMILY SITE
ABOUT
CHARLES CLAWSON RICHARDSON

MY FATHER BY ORPHAR ALBERTS?CHARLES CLAWSON RICHARDSON, FIRST SON OF PHOEBE W CHILD AND EBENEZER CLAWSON RICHARDSON
WAS BORN MAY 3, 1851 IN A LITTLE COLONY CALLED BINGHAM'S FORT, LATER CALLED FIVE POINTS , LOCATED JUST NORTH OF OGDEN,
UTAH.??SINCE THE WALL AROUND THIS FORT WAS NOT FINISHED AND THERE WAS CONSIDERABLE INDIAN TROUBLE, GOV. BRIGHAM YOUNG
ADVISED THE SETTLERS TO MOVE TO OGDEN FOR PROTECTION; THERE THEY WERE BUILDING A WALL AROUND THE CITY. THIS WALL WAS A
FORMIDABLE WARNING TO THE INDIANS, THEREFORE IT WAS NEVER NEE DED OR FINISHED.??WHILE RESIDING IN OGDEN THE RICHARDSON'S
HAD A FARM WHERE THE UNION DEPOT NOW STANDS.??AT AN AGE WHEN THE CHILD OF TODAY WOULD HAVE NO RESPONSIBILITIES EXCEPT
SCHOOL OR PLAY LITTLE CHARLES OR CHARLIE AS HE WAS ALWAYS CALLED WAS TRUDGING BAREFOOT OVER THE HILLS AND VALLEY OF
UINTAH HERDING COWS.??WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL HE POINTED OUT TO ME AN OLD CEMETERY ON THE HILSIDE, GRAVES OF A RELIGIOUS
CULT WHO HAD CLASHED WITH THE MORMON SETTLERS. HE SAID HIS FATHER HAD BEEN IN THAT BATTLE AND HAD MIRACULOUSLY ESCAPED
DEATH WHEN A POST HE WAS STANDING BEHIND WAS SHATTERED BY A BULLET. HE ALSO RECALLED THAT WHILE HERDING COWS OVER THAT
SCENE HE HAD GATHERED UP A HATFUL OF OLD LEAD BULLETS WHICH HE SOLD TO BE MELTED AND REMOLDED INTO BULLETS AGAIN.??ALTHO
HE WAS ONLY EIGHT OR NINE YEARS OLD WHEN JOHNSTON'S ARMY CAME TO UTAH HE CLEARLY REMEMBERED IT; ON THEIR FLIGHT SOUTH IT
WAS SO COLD HIS MOTHER'S DRESS FROZE TO THE WAGON BOX. HE TOLD OF GATHERING TOBACCO LEAVES FROM HIS FATHER'S FARM,
SPREADING THE LEAVES WITH MOLASSES AND PRESSING THEM TOGETHER INTO A LARGE CAKE, THIS HE WOULD CUT INTO SMALL SQUARES AND
SELL TO THE SOLDIERS, ALSO TO IMMIGRANTS WHO STOPPED FROM SUPPLIES ON THEIR WESTWARD TREK.??HIS FAMILY LIVED IN RIVERDALE
FOR A WHILE ALSO IN OGDEN VALLEY. IN HIS EARLY TEENS THEY MOVED TO PLAIN CITY WHERE HI S FATHER BOUGHT THE OLD ROCK HOUSE
FROM WILLIAM SKEEN; HERE HE LIVED AND GREW TO MANHOOD.??HIS MOTHER AND AUNT POLLY SHARED THIS HOUSE AND HIS FATHER' S
FIRST WIFE, AUNT ANGELINE, LIVED NEAR BY. THE CHILDREN ALL GREW UP TOGETHER ALMOST AS ONE FAMILY UNIT, CHARLIE WAS ALWAYS
INDIGNANT WHEN ANYONE SPOKE OF HALF BROTHERS TO HIM. THEY WORE ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS AND HE WAS VERY FOND OF THEM
ALL.??THEY RAISED A NICE GARDEN AND AN ORCHARD ON THE PLACE BORE DELICIOUS FRUIT; WHEN CHARLIE WAS COURTING THE GIRLS HE
TOOK THEM GIFTS OF FRUIT AND, ESPECIALLY GRAPES FROM THE OLD VINES THAT ARE STILL YIELDING AND HAVE BECOME ALMOST A
TRADITION FOR THE PAST EIGHTY YEARS. I DARE SAY THERE ARE FE W CHILDREN OF ANY GENERATION IN PLAIN CITY WHO HAVEN'T EATEN
SOME OF THOSE GRAPES.??CHARLIE WAS A GAY YOUNG BLADE AND COURTED A NUMBER OF GIRLS BUT HIS FINAL CHOICE WAS AMANDA
KNIGHT, A SWEET YOUNG GIRL WITH PRETTY RED HAIR AND VIOLET BLUE EYES.??HE HAD A SLEEK TEAM OF BAYS AND A SLEIGH THAT WAS HIS
PRIDE AND JOY; HOW THRILLED AMANDA WAS WHEN HE CAME CALLING WITH SLEIGH BELLS RINGING. HE MUST HAVE CUT QUITE A FIGURE
WITH THE GIRLS, PROBABLY RIVALING THE BOY OF TODAY WITH A HOT-ROD.??IN THE FALL OF 1873 THEY WERE PLANNING ON GETTING
MARRIED . HE AND HIS FATHER HAD A GOOD CROP OF GRAIN, CHARLIE'S SHARE WOULD BE A GOOD START FOR A LITTLE HOME, BUT WHAT A
TERRIBLE DISAPPOINTMENT WAS IN STORE FOR THEM, SOMEONE SET FIRE TO THE STACKS AND THEY WERE COMPLETELY DESTROYED. THIS
WAS AN AWFUL FINANCIAL LOSS TO HIS FATHER TOO, WHO THEN WENT TO CALIFORNIA TO TRY HIS LUCK IN THE GOLD MINES.??CHARLIE
THEN WENT TO THE BISHOP FOR ADVICE WHO SAID, "GO AH EAD AND GET MARRIED AND IF YOU ARE FAITHFUL THE LORD WILL
PROVIDE."??THEY WERE MARRIED 27 OCT 1873 IN THE ENDOWMENT HOUSE IN SALT LAKE CITY, THE TEMPLE WAS NOT COMPLETED THEN. THE
YOUNG COUPLE SET UP HOUSEKEEPING IN ONE LITTLE RENTED ROOM. THE PARENTS GAVE THEM A FEW NECESSITIES, THE BRIDE'S MOTHER GAVE
THEM A NICE FEATHER BED AND PILLOWS, A FEW DRYGOODS BOXES COMPLETED THE FURNISHINGS. THIS WAS THE WAY MOST OF TH E YOUNG
FOLKS STARTED OUT, SO THEY DID NOT MIND. SO WITH EMPTY POCKETS AND HEARTS FULL OF LOVE THEY FACED THE FUTURE.??CHARLIE HAD
NEVER HAD NEVER HAD THE OPPORTUNITY OF ATTENDING SCHOOL SO DURING THE LONG WINTER EVENINGS AMANDA TAUGHT HIM TO READ
AND WRITE.??LATE THE NEXT SUMMER THEY WERE BLESSED WITH THEIR FIRST LITTLE SON, GREAT GRANDMA CHILD WAS THE ATTENDING
MIDWIFE, GRANDMA RICHARDSON AND GRANDMA KNIGHT WERE THERE TO ASSIST.??IN SEPT. OF THAT YEAR HIS FATHER DIED OF AN INJURY
HE RECEIVED IN THE GOLD MINE.??CHARLIE TOOK HIS LITTLE FAMILY TO FAIRVIEW, SANPETE CO., WHERE HE WORKED FOR A TIME, THEIR
SECOND SON WAS BORN THERE . THEY THEN RETURNED TO PLAIN CITY WHERE THEY STAYED LONG ENOUGH FOR THREE LITTLE GIRLS TO BE
BORN TO THEM, THEY HAD THE MISFORTUNE TO LOOSE THEIR FIRST LITTLE GIRL, A VICTI M OF A SCARLET FEVER EPIDEMIC.??REPORTS WERE
COMING IN OF GOOD LAND TO BE HOMESTEADED IN IDAHO SO CHARLIE TOOK HIS FAMILY UP THERE FOR A FEW YEARS, THEN BACK TO PLAIN
CITY. AMANDA'S HEART WAS EVER IN UTAH BUT SHE LOVED HER HUSBAND AND FELT IT HER DUTY TO GO WHEREVER HE SO DESIRED.??DURING
THE TERRIBLE EPIDEMICS THAT USED TO SWEEP THE COUNTRY HE WOULD GO INTO THE HOMES OF NEIGHBORS TO CARE FOR THE SICK AND
DYING DISREGARDING THE DANGER TO HIMSELF. HE WAS CALLED AT ALL HOURS OF THE DAY OR NIGHT TO ADMINISTER TO TH E SICK; HE
SEEMED TO HAVE THE GIFT OF HEALING FOR MANY TIMES WHEN HE PLACED HIS HANDS ON THEIR HEADS IN THE POWER OF THE PRIESTHOOD
THEY WERE HEALED. HE WAS STRONG, YET SO GENTLE AND KIND HE COULD LIFT THE SICK ONES WITHOUT HURTING THEM, SO HE WAS MUCH IN
DEMAND, DOCTORS WERE FEW AND TRAINED NURSES ALMOST UNHEARD OF. MANY TIMES HE SAT UP NIGHTS WITH THE DEAD AND WASHED AND
DRESSED THEM FOR BURIAL. HE ALONE BURIED NINE CHILDREN FROM A SKEEN FAMILY WHO HAD DIED OF BLACK SMALLPOX.??ONE NIGHT
WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG MAN HE AND A COMPANION WERE SITTING UP WITH AN OLD MAN WHO WAS ALMOST BENT DOUBLE , TO
STRAIGHTEN HIM OUT SO HE COULD BE PUT IN A CASKET A LARGE ROCK WAS PLACED ON HIS CHEST AND ONE ON HIS LEGS, IN THE NIGHT THE
ROCK ROLLED OFF WITH A BANG AND THE OLD MAN SAT UP, AN AIR BUBLE WAS FORCED UP FROM HIS STOMACH AND MADE A GROANING
SOUND. THE COMPANION FLED LEAVING CHARLIE TO SIT ALONE. I'VE HEARD HIM TELL THIS AND LAUGH BUT I'LL BET IT WAS MUCH FUNNIER IN
THE DAYLIGHT THAN IT WAS THAT NIGHT BY CANDLELIGHT.??IN THE SPRING OF 1892 THERE WAS A LAND BOOM IN WYOMING, CHARLIE WAS
HIRED BY A COMPANY INTERESTED IN THE INTERPRISE TO DRIVE A TEAM TO FORT BRIDGER. THE OPPORTUNITIES LOOKED PROMISING THERE
SO HE MOVED HIS FAMILY UP THERE. THEY ENJOY ED THE JOURNEY, STOPPING AT FARMHOUSES ALONG THE WAY, OR SOMETIMES SLEEPING IN
SCHOOLHOUSES. USUALLY EVERYONE WAS HOSPITABLE AND EAGER FOR NEWS FROM THE SETTLEMENTS. THE CHILDREN COULD SING AND
RECITE, OFTEN THE TWO FAMILIES JOINED I N SINGING HYMNS AND A PLEASANT EVENING WOULD BE SPENT, OCCASIONALLY THEY MET A
CRANK WHO WOULD NOT EVEN LET THEM CAMP CLOSE BY, ONE MAN WOULD NOTPERMIT THE CHILDREN OR EVEN TH E HORSES TO HAVE A
DRINK OF WATER MILL AN UNREASONABLE PRICE WAS PAID.??FORT BRIDGER WAS A DESERTED ARMY CAMP, THERE WERE MANY OLD LOG
HOUSES AND DISCARDED FURNISHINGS WHICH THE PEOPLE MOVING IN PUT TO GOOD USE, EVEN THEN LIFE THERE WAS PRIMITIVE AND CRUDE,
THERE WERE NO SCHOOLS OR CHURCH, A BROTHER CAME TO VISIT AND TOOK CHARLIE TO TASK FOR TAKING HIS CHILDREN INTO SUCH A
WILDERNESS. THE CLIMATE DID NOT AGREE WITH HIM AND HIS HORSES GOT SICK. AFTER A FEW WEEKS, SICK AND DISCOURAGED HE PACKED
UP AND LEFT INTENDING TO GO TO SNAKE RIVER VALLEY.??THE TRIP AROUND BEAR LAKE WAS VERY PLEASANT, THEY COUGHT FI SH AND
SAGEHENS AND ENJOYED THE BEAUTY OF THE LAKE AND MOUNTAINS. THE FAMILY GREW WEARY OF TRAVELING AND WANTED TO SETTLE DOWN
SO CHARLIE TOSSED A COIN TO SEE IF THEY WOULD STOP IN MARSH VALLEY OR GO ON TO SNAKE RIVER VALLEY. THE DICISION WAS MARSH
VALLEY.??THEY TOOK UP A PIECE OF LAND AND STARTED FARMING, AND REMAINED THERE A NUMBER OF YEARS, SEVERAL CHILDREN WERE
BORN THERE AND TWO LITTLE GRAVES WERE LEFT THERE. THE FIRST SON FOUND HIMSELF A BRIDE AND THE THREE OLDER GIRLS MET THEIR
FUTURE HUSBANDS. THE OLDEST DAUGHTER, MARTHA, TOOK A COURSE IN OBSTETRICS AND BECAME A MIDWIFE.??AT ONE TIME WHILE THERE A
PLEASANT MANNERED STRANGER RODE IN REQUESTING A SUPPLY OF BREAD AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR A T RIP INTO THE MOUNTAINS
PROMISING TO RETURN IN A FEW DAYS AND PAY FOR IT, THE FOLKS WILLINGLY SHARED THEIR MEAGRE STORE , THE MONEY WAS BADLY
NEEDED ESPECIALLY FOR BABY A PAIR OF SHOES. SOON AFTER HE LEFT THE SHERIFF AND DEPUTIES CAME ALONG. THE STRANGER WAS A
FUGITIVE FROM JUSTICE. BABY DIDN'T GET HER SHOES.??CHARLIE AGAIN GOT ITCHY FEET AND DECIDED TO MOVE, THIS TIME TO POCATELLO.
NO WONDER THEY TOLD THE STORY OF THE CHICKENS THAT LAYED ON THEIR BACKS TO GET THEIR FEET TIED EVERY TIME THEY SAY HIM
HITCH UP HIS TEAM. SEEMS THE GRASS ALW AYS LOOKED GREENER IN THE NEXT PASTURE OR PERHAPS HE WAS TRYING TO OUT RUN THE
STOCK, BUT WHEREVER THEY WERE IT CAUGH T UP WITH THEM EVERY OTHER YEAR. HE NEVER FELT THAT THERE WERE TOO MANY OF THEM AS
HE LOVED THEM ALL AND WAS SO PROUD OF ANY OF THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS. HIS HEART NEVER STOPPED ACHING FOR THE LITTLE ONES THEY
HAD LOST. I HAVE SEEN HIM CRY AS HE TOLD ME ABOUT JOHNNIE AND HATTIE WHO HAD DIED MANY YEARS BEFORE I WAS BORN, AND SMILE
AS HE WOULD REPEAT THEIR CUTE SAYINGS AND JOHNNIE'S WITTY REMARKS. HE WAS JUST FOUR AND SHE TWO WHEN THEY DIED JUST TWO
DAYS APART.??CHARLIE LIVED DURING THE HOMESTEADING AND AGRICULTURAL PERIOD BUT THAT WAS NOT HIS REAL CALLING, HE
PREFERRED BUSINESS WHERE HE COULD ASSOCIATE WITH PEOPLE, HE WAS SUCH A FRIEDNLY SOCIABLE PERSON. HE TRIED A GROCERY STORE
A TIME OR TW O BUT WAS TOO TRUSTING AND GENEROUS TO MAKE ANY MONEY. USUALLY HE PEDDLED FRUIT AND VEGETABLES AND DID
PRETTY WELL AT IT BUT ANYONE WITH A HARDLUCK STORY COULD GET HIS LAST DIME.??HE WAS AN EXPERT AT SWIMMING AND DIVING AND
WHILE IN POCATELLO HE WAS FREQUENTLY CALLED ON TO DIVE FOR BODIES IN THE PORTNEUF RIVER; IT LOOKS LIKE SUCH A LITTLE RIVER
BUT IT I S DEEP AND TREACHEROUS IN PLACES AS IT WINDS THROUGH LAVA BEDS AND MANY PEOPLE ARE DROWNED IN IT.?CHARLIE BUILT A
FEED YARD WITH A BIG BARN THAT SHELTERED MORE THAN A HUNDRED HORSES. THERE WERE CAMPHOUSES FOR THE TRAVELERS, ONE WAS
RESERVED FOR THE INDIANS. A FEED YARD WAS A FORERUNNER TO TODAYS MOTELS.??MANY OF THE WAY FARRERS WERE BROKE AND HUNGRY
BUT NONE WERE EVER TURNED AWAY WITHOUT A MEAL. I WAS A TINY GIRL BUT CAN STILL REMEMBER OF INDIANS COMING BEGGING,
"SEQUAW HONGARY, PAPOOSE HUNGARY, GIMME BISCUIT." HOW OFTEN WE CHILDREN WERE CROWDED A LITTLE CLOSER AT THE TABLE TO
MAKE ROOM FOR A SQUAW AND HER PAPOOSE, A TRAMP OR A NEGRO. COLOR OR CREED MEANT NOTHING TO CHARLIE, THEY WERE ALL GOD'S
CHILDREN . IF WE PROTESTED HE WOULD SAY, "NEVER TURN ANY ONE AWAY HUNGRY OR YOU MAY BE HUNGARY YOURSELF SOMEDAY. OR HE
WOULD REMIND ME OF THE LITTLE STORY, "THE MASTER IS COMING."??AMANDA DIDN'T BEGRUDGE THE FOOD OR EXTRA WORK BUT
SOMETIMES WHEN CHARLIE WAS AWAY SHE WAS FRIGHTENED HALF TO DEATH OF SOME OF THE STRANGE CHARACTERS AND WAS QUITE
CONCERNED ABOUT HER HOUSEFUL OF LITTLE GIRLS AND OFTEN LONGED FOR THE PEACE AND SECURITY OF HER OLD HOME IN PLAIN CITY. SHE
LOVED TO TELL THE CHILDREN OF THE BEAUTY OF UTAH AND WHEN A MEADOWLARK SANG SHE WOULD SAY, "IT IS SAYING, UTAH IS A PRETTY
LITTLE PLACE."??OF COURSE, THERE WERE MANY FINE PEOPLE IN POCATELLO AND THE RICHARDSON'S HAD A HOST OF VERY DEAR FRIENDS.
THEY HAD HAPPY TIMES AS WELL AS SAD TIMES THERE. THEIR FOURTEENTH CHILD, A LITTLE GIRL WAS BORN THERE AND A BEAUTIFUL
TEENAGE DAUGHTER DIED THERE.??DURING SLACK TIMES JOE TOOK CARE OF THE YARD AND CHARLIE PEDDLED FRUIT AND VEGETABLES AND
OFTEN MEAT AND MILK WAS ON THE PEDDLE WAGON.??FREQUENTLY AFTER THE LOAD WAS SOLD HE WOULD GATHER UP ALL THE
NEIGHBORHOOD CHILDREN HIS WAGON WOULD HOLD AND TAKE THEM FOR A RIDE OUT INTO THE COUNTRY. THERE WERE FEW CARS I N THOSE
DAYS AND A RIDE PAST THE CITY LIMITS WAS A REAL TREAT. CARS WERE STILL SUCH A NOVELTY THAT WHEN ONE CAME BY MOTHER WOULD
CALL, "CHILDREN COME QUICK, HERE COMES AN AUTOMOBILE." WE'D ALL TEAR TO THE DOOR TO SEE IT CHUG BY AT TH E AMAZING SPEED OF
EIGHT OR TEN MILES AN HOUR.??IN THE SUMMER OF 1907 CHARLIE RECEIVED WORD THAT HIS SISTER ANGELINE WAS SERIOUSLY BURNED AND
HER SHEDS AND COOPS DESTROYED BY FIRE. HE WENT TO HER HOME IN PLAIN CITY AND ARRIVED THERE IN TIME TO SEE HER BEFORE SHE
DIED. WHILE THERE HIS MOTHER AND BROTHERS PERSAUDED HIM TO BUY THE OLD FAMI LY HOME AND MOVE BACK TO PLAIN CITY. THIS
PLEASED HIS WIFE VERY MUCH AND IN SEPTEMBER THE FAMILY AND POSSESSIONS WERE LOADED INTO TWO COVERED WAGONS AND GROUGHT
TO THE OLD ROCK HOME.??THE HOUSE HAD BEEN VACANT FOR A WHILE AND THE WEEDS WERE AS HIGH AS THE EAVES. THE WELL WAS CAVING
IN AND WAS FULL OF DEBRIS. IN A SHORT TIME WITH THE HELP OF ALL THE CHILDRE N THE PLACE WAS ALL CLEANED UP AND MADE LIVABLE,
A NEW PUM P WAS DRIVEN THAT PRODUCED GOOD COLD WATER, IN THE MEANTIME WATER HAD TO BE CARRIED FROM A SPRING BELOW THE
HILL IN THE OLD PETERSON PASTURE.??THE FOLKS WERE HAPPY IN THE OLD HOME, CHARLIE GOT A PEDDLE WAGON AND JOE WORKED ON
ROAD CONSTRUCTION AND FARM WORK , HE ALSO WORKED ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE BAMBERGER RAILROAD WHEN IT WAS BUILT UP
THRU BRIGHAM CITY.??CHARLIE ENJOYED LIVING NEAR HIS PEOPLE AND VISITED THEM OFTEN, HE ALSO ENJOYED TAKING HIS FAMILY TO VIST
HIS WIFE'S BROTHERS AND SISTER AUNT MARTHA WHEELEER; MANY PLEASANT AFTER NOONS AND EVENINGS WERE SPENT IN THEIR
HOMES.??HIS SISTER AMANDA CAME TO LIVE WITH GRANDMA RICHARDSON AND ABOUT JAN 1912 SHE DIED SUDDENLY OF A STROKE, THE NEXT
YEAR CHARLIE ALSO WAS STRICKEN WITH A STROKE, HE DIED MARCH 19, 1913 AT THE AGE OF 62.??AMANDA LIVED ON IN THE OLD HOME, SHE
MISSED HER COMPANION BUT WAS HAPPY IN HER CHURCH WORK AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES. ONE BY ONE HER DAUGHTERS MARRIED AND WENT
TO HOMES OF THEIR OWN UNTIL JUST SHE AND JOE WERE LEFT. HE TOOK CARE OF THE HOME AND HIS MOTHER IN HER DECLINING
YEARS.??NEIGHBORS AND RELATIVES WERE FRIENDLY AND KIND; THE GREAVE GIRLS RAN IN OFTEN AND WERE ALMOST LIKE DAUGHTERS OF
HER OWN. SHE FREQUENTLY TOOK A WALK DOWN TO HER DAUGHTER SARAH'S, STOPPING TO VISIT THE MANY RELATIVES ALONG THE
WAY.??SHE KNITTED BEAUTIFUL LACE AND MADE EACH OF HER GRANDCHILDREN ENOUGH FOR A PAIR OF PILLOW CASES TO BE GIVEN THEM ON
THEIR WEDDING DAY, SOME OF WHOM WERE STILL TINY BABIES. MANY LUCKEY BRIDES RECEIVED IT FOR SHOWER GIFTS, AND MANY TINY
LAYETTES WERE ADRONED WITH HER DAINTY LACE.??IN THE WINTER OF '35 HER HEALTH BEGAN TO FAIL, EACH OF HER DAUGHTERS WANTED
HER TO COME AND LIVE WITH THEM BUT SHE WOULD NOT LEAVE THE HOME THAT WAS SO DEAR TO HER HEART. SHE LEFT US IN MARCH OF
THAT YEAR JUST BEFORE HER 77TH BIRTHDAY.?THE OLD ROCK HOUSE IS LONELY AND DESERTED NOW AND HARDLY INHABITABLE BUT IT
HOLDS SO MANY CHARISHED MEMORIES I HOPE SOME DAY IT WILL BE REPAIRED. AND AGAIN BE A 'HOME SWEET HOM E".
Ebenezer Clawson Richardson Jr.
1852-1922
Emma Jane Singleton
1857-1938
M: 15 Oct 1875
Ebenezer Clawson Richardson
1815-1874
Polly Ann Child
1821-1905
M: November 1843
Plain City, Utah, USA
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA
Josiah Richardson
1783-1842
Lowly Foote
1778-1844
M: 1809
Dryden, Tompkins, New York, USA
William Richardson
1755-1819
Mary Tennison
1755-
M: 27 Mar 1785
Rome, Oneida, New York, USA