JOHN HENRY CHADBURN & MARY MORLEY
NOTTINGHAM ENGLAND * DEWEYVILLE UTAH
JOHN HENRY CHADBURN
1815-1887
MARY MORLEY
1819-1887
M 28 MAR 1840
PARENTS:
SAMUEL CHADBURN
1793-
REBECCA WRIGHT
1793-
M 28 NOV 1814
PARENTS:
WILLIAM MORLEY
1791-1866
ELLEN GREEN
1790-1841
M 14 MAY 1809
MARY ANN CHADBURN
1841-1841
SARAH ANN CHADBURN
1842-1903
ELIZA CHADBURN
1844-1905
WILLIAM CHADBURN
1846-1903
HENRY CHADBURN JR
1849-1917
REBBECA CHADBURN
1852-1858
 
THOMAS TAYLOR
M 1  JAN 1863
GEORGE SEVERN COX
M 6 JAN 1867
1 ELLEN CAVALIER
2 MARY SMITH
3 KATE ROGERS
MARY DORINDA LLOYD
M DEC  1874
 
FREDERICK CHADBURN
1852-1928
SAMUEL CHADBURN
1858-1934
ELLEN CHADBURN
1860-1862
MARY ANN HATCHBURN
M 1 JUNE 1883
EMILY LAURA KEEFER
M 25 SEPT 1889
 
Henry Chadburn Sr.
Contributed By Mitzie Rogers • 29 March 2013 •

Great, Great Grandpa Henry Chadburn and wife Mary Morley lived in Nottingham, England. He had a family of nine children, five girls and four boys. Their first child died
when she was four years old and the last one died when she was five and their sixth child died when she was seven. Henry Chadburn, Great, Great Grandpa, and two of his
sisters came to Utah, one brother went to New York, one to Idaho and the other brother stayed in England. Samuel was the only one my mother knew. Great, Great Grandpa
Chadburn was three weeks on the ocean. He came to Iron Town the other side of Pinto and worked in the iron foundry. He was an iron molder by trade. My mother (Remola)
has a flat iron that he made. Henry is son of Samuel and Rebecca Wright Chadburn.  He was a frame work knitter by trade.  Henry was baptized a member of the church and
was a member of the Mansfield branch.  He worked hard and sent most of his children to America before he came.  He sailed on the ship Nevada at age 63.  29 June 1878 with
wife and grandaughter Rebecca age 10 yrs.  (daughter of William and Ellen Chevalier Chadburn.  They settled in Weber then Deweyville.  They both died and are burried in
Deweyville.
History of Henry Chadburn, Jr. by LaPrele Chadburn Graham
Contributed By PattiIverson1 • 12 May 2013 • 0 Comments

Henry Chadburn was born 13 July 1849 at Old Radford, Nottinghamshire, England, the son of Henry Chadburn and Mary Morley.  He came to America on the ship, Minnesota.  
He had a sister, Sarah Ann, who married Thomas Taylor and they lived in Parowan, Iron County, Utah.  He got a job hauling logs, with an ox team, to the saw mill.Grandfather
went to Pioche, Nevada on the stage.  He was standing on the street in Pioche when a man shot a fellow across the way, because he had threatened his life the night before.  
Grandfather was so frightened that he walked all the way to Panaca, not waiting for the stage to come.  Panaca at that time was called Bullionville.A man by the name of
Brother Lee gave him a job cutting wood to earn his meal.  Then he made his way to Parowan and walked all the way.  He was unable to locate any water and almost choked to
death.  His tongue was swollen so badly that it wouldn’t stay in his mouth.  When he got some water, he kept putting it on his tongue and it took the swelling out of it.The next
town Grandpa went to was Iron Town.  He got a job there as a molderman.  It was there he met and married Mary Dorinda Lloyd on 14 December 1874.  As time went on, they
decided to buy a ranch that the Jeffrey’s had for sale.  They thought it would be a good location for a home.  Mary Dorinda Lloyd’s father and mother were Robert Lewis Lloyd
and Eliza Adeline Goheen.  They lived in Washington, Utah.  They later moved to Pine Valley and helped Grandma and Grandpa clear the ground and fence some of the ground.  
Their home was made to be a stopping place for the travelers.  It was in a very good location for the stage coach line, mail line, and travelers of all kinds.  
They really had hard times.  Grandfather had a pair of buckskin pants and when they got wet they shrank.  He looked so tough that he told Grandmother that if anyone came
and asked for Henry to tell them “I’m away”.Grandfather would go hunting and fishing to get food to help with the living.  He had to work hard to get the wood ready for
winter, pile it all up and then cut it and put it under shelter so it would be dry for winter.  As time went by they were blessed with eight sons and two daughters.  Indeed a lovely
family.Grandmother loved to sing and as children grew, each one was given an instrument for a birthday.  My father, Archie Morley Chadburn, tells about his mother and
father giving him a guitar for his eighth birthday.  He would go outside and sit in the shade by a large tree and practice until he learned another tune and then go and play it, as
a surprise, to his parents.They needed a new home, so the nice red rocks were hauled and fixed for the new home and it was made very nice.  It was a two story one and the
yards were something to be proud of.  Nice fruit was raised to the peddled to the people in Pioche, Panaca, Caliente, and may other nearby towns and to travelers.  He placed
fruit in the fair and it brought grandfather honors each year.  Chad was known by everyone as the sons that played for the dances, the sons that go fishing, and the sons that
worked to till the soil.  He was known for the lovely cattle that he raised.Then came the day when all were gone from home, except George.  He was their pride and joy, a
wonderful violin player.  He went to St. George to school and took music lessons.  He loved to play the piece, “Just Before the Battle, Mother”.  It was his mother’s favorite.
In October 1917 George had to go to war.  He told his mother, “I will only have to go for six months”.  She really felt bad and got sick.  The doctor came to treat her, but she
had quick pneumonia and died on 4 October 1917.  Grandpa Chadburn died 17 November 1917.Grandpa came to America for the wonderful church they had joined.  He was
baptized in England by Elder Clayton and confirmed by Elder Grimshaw.This couple was blessed.  They worked hard for what they had and were really proud of their family.  
Thanks to them and to my parents for what they have done for me.  Thanks to my Uncle George and Aunt Alta and my Father for the part they have had in making this
history.  Also I am thankful to my Mother and her posterity.
A BRIEF HISTORY OF SARAH ANN CHADBURN TAYLOR
Contributed By Mitzie Rogers • 3 July 2013 •

A BRIEF HISTORY OF SARAH ANN CHADBURN TAYLOR
As written by her son Samuel Wesley Taylor
My mother Sarah Ann Chadburn, was born 7 march 1842, in Nottinghamshire, England. She worked in a textile factory during her girlhood.
Her parents were not people of means but were thrifty, hardworking honest in spirit and soul and my mother inherited all of these virtues. It was while working in the textile
factory that my father's and mother's families were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. My father, Thomas Taylor and my mother were acquainted
and became sweethearts in their youth and pledged to remain faithful to each other through this life and throughout eternity. The dream of both families was to be able to
move to Zion. They worked hard, sacrificed to save money and finally the Taylor family sent their father and his son, Thomas, to the United States They reached the United
State on the 29th of May 1898. Thomas was a young man of 17 years of age when he arrived in New York City and went to work. My father, Thomas secured work driving a
horse and buggy in a taxi service.
The owner of the  business was very kind to him, often giving him an extra five dollar gold piece at the end of the week. At the end of a year and a half, Thomas and his father
had saved enough money to enable them to send for the rest of the Taylor family. Thomas worked for another year in New York City and saved enough to bring his sweetheart
to America. Sarah Ann Chad burn arrived in the winter of 1862, about the time of the Christmas holidays. Thomas and Sarah were married in New York City on the 1st of
January 1963 Sarah and her dear husband Thomas were very much in love, and had appreciated the help from his family in assisting them with Wedding plans and housing
Sarah during the short period of her arrival and their Wedding. They remained in New York City a few months longer, working and saving to go to Zion. When they had saved
enough funds they traveled by rail to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, then traveled by ox-team to Salt Lake City, Utah. They traveled in the Nebker train enduring an the hardships
incident to the Pioneer way of life. Father and They lived in Weber County, Utah, for a short time then moved to American Fork in Utah also. They were called by the Church
officials to help strengthen the Church in Parowan, Iron County, Utah, where they lived out their lives. My mother had twelve children, I being number nine. All of these
children were born to her without the assistance of a physician or anesthetic. She was however, attended by a wonderful woman named Pilina Lyman, a very successful midwife.
The house where I was born was of concrete, lime, and cobblestone construction that my mother and father had built. Until I was quite old the house consisted of but the two
rooms. I remember well at mealtime, when the whole family was at home, there were not sufficient places around the table for all of us, so the younger ones would take their
plates and sit on the floor. We sat in the corner and were just as happy, but sometimes we would have liked to sit at the table.
It was during my second year at high school in Beaver that my mother died. I had been at camp all summer, and when I returned it was easy for me to discern that she had
failed a great deal. I knew she was not well and was suffering. Then they called it gallstones, she bad suffered with the passage of gall stones through the bile duct. This was
very painful. When I was at home during the most painful of these times I went into the field so I could not hear her cry out in pain. She suffered from this affliction until it
caused her death. She passed on 26th of November 1903. Mother was a hard working, loving mother, who spent all her time working for her family. She was a devoted wife and
mother. When any of her family were ill she would stand a 24 hour vigil until her loved one had recovered. Mother worked in the Primary since her love was for her children
and the well being she felt they deserved. I have always felt very blessed for the heritage she left us. (this history was taken from the Chadburn book as prepared by Uncle
George and Aunt Alta Chad burn)